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Born on this day ...
Tim Renwick was born on this day in 1949 in Cambridge, England. He is a simply fabulous guitarist and has played, recorded and toured with, amongst others, David Bowie (Space Oddity), the Sutherland Brothers and Quiver, Al Stewart (a lot), Procol Harum, Elton John, Mike Oldfield, Gary Brooker, Andy Gibb, Barry Gibb, Paul McCartney, Paul Carrack, Claire Hammill, Mike + the Mechanics, Eric Clapton, and extensively (in their various incarnations) with Richard Wright, Roger Waters, Pink Floyd, David Gilmour, etcetera, etceteraaa!
 
He is held in high esteem for both his ability and versatility (he’s played with artists as diverse as Dolly Parton, Joshua Kadison, Demis Roussos and Celine Dion, for example), and he seems remarkably modest about it all too – now retired comfortably to Cornwall and says “it’s been a good life”. Can’t establish if he’s still playing but he did have a ‘local’ band going not so long ago.
 
In addition to the above, he’s made a couple of solo albums, and written and recorded a fair amount of production music for TV and film in his home studio, although how he found the time, I don’t know! A link to his site and some audio samples of his solo albums as those are difficult to find on YT - http://www.timrenwick.com/audio.html
 
This is from an obscure studio band Mr R was in way back when, Lazy Racer – he’s on lead vocal and guitar … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDaBFKTmpcw – they made two albums and then parted ways.
 
An instrumental track from the Sutherland Brothers and Quiver’s Slipstream … composed and played by the gentleman in question … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7xw0jf2d5w
 
And I really like this track from Al Stewart’s Modern Times (with apologies for multiple repetitions), especially for the guitar, and until now had been completely oblivious to the fact that it’s Renwick’s gorgeous touch I’m hearing! Not sure who I thought it was … no thought whatsoever, obviously! … Oh well. Now I know … 



"The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us." ~ Bill Watterson




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Madelaine Edith “Maddy” Prior, MBE was born on this day 1947, in Blackpool, Lancashire, England. She is folk/rock singer, dancer and percussionist, widely known for her work with Steeleye Span (“All Around My Hat” went gold for them). Ms Prior has released sixteen solo albums and done a lot of  session work for other artists - Ralph Mc Tell, Jethro Tull, Mike Oldfield, to name some of the more prominent. She has additionally collaborated and made albums with others, for example, June Tabor (Silly Sisters), Tim Hart, and The Carnival Band.
 
I haven’t heard Sails of Silver in at least a hundred years and have also not followed Steeleye Span through the ages; it’s so strange listening again! Lol!! Part of the enjoyment of this thread, for me, is that it pops up all sorts of things - some new discoveries and some ancient, long forgotten rediscoveries – in this instance, a tad dated, but it was good, and I must’ve listened to it a lot since I actually remember all the songs. Fun, in any event. To date, Steeleye Span has released 22 studio albums and Maddy Prior appears on 20 of them.
 
I found this lovely song she did, from an Alan Simon rock opera (which I supposedly disdain  – haven’t heard it all but may have to eat my words … all sorts of wonderful musicians – Andreas Vollenweider, Jon Anderson, Justin Hayward, and produced by Alan Parsons) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N45kF-jedbw
 
The title track from the aforementioned Sails of Silverhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-bJ16plWBE – and the final song, “Tell Me Why” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CV9G7DUE_qk
 
Steeleye Span’s most recent album was released late last year and is titled Dodgy Bastards, with which it is filled! Taken from an anthology of ballads recounting unsavoury tales of yore which were not allowed to be widely heard at the time, for fear of rousing the peasants to rebellion, no doubt! I was pleasantly surprised by this music and it’s not staid at all. Different line-up of course what with nearly 50 years having swanned blithely past – they started in 1969. This is folk rock with progressive leanings; the instruments are great – beautiful violin, lovely guitar work and the timbre of Maddy’s voice seems to have warmed too, which is easier on my personal ear.  
 
I particularly liked this one – “All Things Are Quite Silent” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cT9oJzTZiEw
 
The closer is great too but I couldn’t find a clip, dammit - it’s “The Lofty Tall Ship / Shallow Brown”, however, this track is also a standout - “Cromwell’s Skull” – fabulous stringed things … 



"The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us." ~ Bill Watterson




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(14-08-2017, 18:36)Ruby Wrote: Madelaine Edith “Maddy” Prior, MBE was born on this day 1947, in Blackpool, Lancashire, England. She is folk/rock singer, dancer and percussionist, widely known for her work with Steeleye Span (“All Around My Hat” went gold for them). Ms Prior has released sixteen solo albums and done a lot of  session work for other artists - Ralph Mc Tell, Jethro Tull, Mike Oldfield, to name some of the more prominent. She has additionally collaborated and made albums with others, for example, June Tabor (Silly Sisters), Tim Hart, and The Carnival Band.
 
I haven’t heard Sails of Silver in at least a hundred years and have also not followed Steeleye Span through the ages; it’s so strange listening again! Lol!! Part of the enjoyment of this thread, for me, is that it pops up all sorts of things - some new discoveries and some ancient, long forgotten rediscoveries – in this instance, a tad dated, but it was good, and I must’ve listened to it a lot since I actually remember all the songs. Fun, in any event. To date, Steeleye Span has released 22 studio albums and Maddy Prior appears on 20 of them.
 
I found this lovely song she did, from an Alan Simon rock opera (which I supposedly disdain  – haven’t heard it all but may have to eat my words … all sorts of wonderful musicians – Andreas Vollenweider, Jon Anderson, Justin Hayward, and produced by Alan Parsons) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N45kF-jedbw
 
The title track from the aforementioned Sails of Silverhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-bJ16plWBE – and the final song, “Tell Me Why” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CV9G7DUE_qk
 
Steeleye Span’s most recent album was released late last year and is titled Dodgy Bastards, with which it is filled! Taken from an anthology of ballads recounting unsavoury tales of yore which were not allowed to be widely heard at the time, for fear of rousing the peasants to rebellion, no doubt! I was pleasantly surprised by this music and it’s not staid at all. Different line-up of course what with nearly 50 years having swanned blithely past – they started in 1969. This is folk rock with progressive leanings; the instruments are great – beautiful violin, lovely guitar work and the timbre of Maddy’s voice seems to have warmed too, which is easier on my personal ear.  
 
I particularly liked this one – “All Things Are Quite Silent” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cT9oJzTZiEw
 
The closer is great too but I couldn’t find a clip, dammit - it’s “The Lofty Tall Ship / Shallow Brown”, however, this track is also a standout - “Cromwell’s Skull” – fabulous stringed things … 




Always interesting to read your posts Ruby. You are a mine of information. Loved her work with Oldfield. He has worked with many vocalists through the years but she was the best.
'The purpose of life is a life of purpose' - Athena Orchard.
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Cromwell's Skull....lovely song Jerome, thanks...!

I like what ive previously heard rom the band, but sadly own nothing...

PS: don't ever mention Oliver Cromwell to an Irishman or your skull will be on display for all to see!
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^You're most welcome CH!  Wink

(15-08-2017, 07:39)Jerome Wrote:
(14-08-2017, 18:36)Ruby Wrote: Madelaine Edith “Maddy” Prior, MBE was born on this day 1947, in Blackpool, Lancashire, England. She is folk/rock singer, dancer and percussionist, widely known for her work with Steeleye Span (“All Around My Hat” went gold for them). Ms Prior has released sixteen solo albums and done a lot of  session work for other artists - Ralph Mc Tell, Jethro Tull, Mike Oldfield, to name some of the more prominent. She has additionally collaborated and made albums with others, for example, June Tabor (Silly Sisters), Tim Hart, and The Carnival Band.
 
I haven’t heard Sails of Silver in at least a hundred years and have also not followed Steeleye Span through the ages; it’s so strange listening again! Lol!! Part of the enjoyment of this thread, for me, is that it pops up all sorts of things - some new discoveries and some ancient, long forgotten rediscoveries – in this instance, a tad dated, but it was good, and I must’ve listened to it a lot since I actually remember all the songs. Fun, in any event. To date, Steeleye Span has released 22 studio albums and Maddy Prior appears on 20 of them.
 
I found this lovely song she did, from an Alan Simon rock opera (which I supposedly disdain  – haven’t heard it all but may have to eat my words … all sorts of wonderful musicians – Andreas Vollenweider, Jon Anderson, Justin Hayward, and produced by Alan Parsons) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N45kF-jedbw
 
The title track from the aforementioned Sails of Silverhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-bJ16plWBE – and the final song, “Tell Me Why” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CV9G7DUE_qk
 
Steeleye Span’s most recent album was released late last year and is titled Dodgy Bastards, with which it is filled! Taken from an anthology of ballads recounting unsavoury tales of yore which were not allowed to be widely heard at the time, for fear of rousing the peasants to rebellion, no doubt! I was pleasantly surprised by this music and it’s not staid at all. Different line-up of course what with nearly 50 years having swanned blithely past – they started in 1969. This is folk rock with progressive leanings; the instruments are great – beautiful violin, lovely guitar work and the timbre of Maddy’s voice seems to have warmed too, which is easier on my personal ear.  
 
I particularly liked this one – “All Things Are Quite Silent” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cT9oJzTZiEw
 
The closer is great too but I couldn’t find a clip, dammit - it’s “The Lofty Tall Ship / Shallow Brown”, however, this track is also a standout - “Cromwell’s Skull” – fabulous stringed things … 




Always interesting to read your posts Ruby. You are a mine of information. Loved her work with Oldfield. He has worked with many vocalists through the years but she was the best.

Thank you Jerome. I'm pleased you enjoy these ramblings!  Shy
"The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us." ~ Bill Watterson




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Happy Birthday to Jimmy Webb who was born on this day in Elk City, Oklahoma, USA. Even if you think you don’t know any of his music, chances are you’ve heard at least a handful of his songs. “By The Time I Get to Phoenix” might have been what started it all – first made popular by the recently late Glen Campbell who sang so many of Webb’s songs and propelled them up the charts. 

Songwriter and arranger extraordinaire, his list of credits and awards is extensive. Not a prolific performer himself, he’s made twelve ‘solo’ albums, and many, many artists have recorded his material. These are but a few of the singers and the songs … 

The mandatory “MacArthur Park” – Richard Harris … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRwYQgk05DY

“By The Time I Get to Phoenix” – Glen Campbell … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7y1hrOpVGKE

Jimmy Webb himself – “Galveston” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U_YK_L_Fr4Q

Art Garfunkel – “All I Know” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IaBjY-zm0sI

Arlo Guthrie – “Oklahoma Nights” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_nq73_nnjY

David Crosby – “Too Young to Die” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4qjJaIfLsk

Joe Cocker’s rendition of “The Moon is a Harsh Mistress” - some great covers of it, it’s difficult to choose one in particular, but his is really full of feeling, I think … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SW9O77Eocmo – Judy Collins is right there too - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBEJehhWRu0

… and the following are all from Jimmy Webb’s 2013 album Still Within the Sound of My Voice – an album of his songs recorded with other well-known artists, such as …

Jackson Brown – “P.F. Sloan” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=170kMomiP08

Mark Knopfler (go figure!) – “The Highwayman” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GigzjefNLRI

And last (on this list), but not least – with Billy Joel – “Wichita Lineman”



"The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us." ~ Bill Watterson




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Gustavo Santaolalla was born on this day in 1951, in El Palomar, Argentina. He sings, and plays the charango, ronroco, guitar, bass and piano and aside from his three solo albums, is the composer of many film scores, including the Oscar winning soundtracks for Brokeback Mountain and Babel, the latter of which contains the stunning title track … the piece that made me notice him ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvdzavGmZww.
 
Another soundtrack I like is from the movie Nanga Parbat, about the Messner brother’s 1970 climb of that very tricky peak. Not a mountain to be messed with this one, the ninth highest in the world and the claimant of many lives. I read a book called “Tigers of the Snow” which covers the disastrous 1934 German expedition to Nanga Parbat about which it is said "for sheer protracted agony, has no parallel in climbing annals." Hectic stuff – the Sherpas were not mountaineers – rather revered the mountains, but in a nutshell, were incredibly poor and drawn by such simple payment as a pair of (used) boots, started working as porters for the ambitious Brits around the 1920’s. On this occasion, in order to save their own skins, two experienced German climbers unroped from their party of Sherpas and skied off down the mountain, leaving them adrift, to fend for themselves – it didn’t end well. Dastardly stuff. Anyway getting back to the movie which is about a different tragic incident, the music works perfectly … this is “The Rescue” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpSoihfAHs8
 
"Iguazu" from Ronroco has been used in various soundtracks - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfusxHokCDg
 
… and there’s so much more -  difficult to choose! This piece of gorgeousness, also from Ronroco, is on the soundtrack of The Motorcycle Diaries … 



"The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us." ~ Bill Watterson




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John Hiatt was born on this day in 1952, in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Difficult to categorise exactly since he’s covered a wide range of genres, but there’s no mistaking that deeply gritty voice and his propensity for blues based rock. 

He has the undisputed ability to pen a great song which is borne out by the innumerable artists who’ve given voice to his compositions; B.B. King for a start, Clapton, Joe Cocker, Dylan, Emmylou, Bonnie Raitt, Ry Cooder, and so on and so forth. A bit of a rocky road Mr Hiatt has trodden – especially early on – took him a while to achieve success and he most certainly seems to have paid his dues. 

Riding With the King is my immediate association, but there's so much more. Courtesy of AMG – “In 1987, John Hiatt, clean and sober and looking for an American record deal, was asked by an A&R man at a British label to name his dream band. After a little thought, Hiatt replied that if he had his druthers, he'd cut a record with Ry Cooder on guitar, Nick Lowe on bass, and Jim Keltner on drums. To Hiatt's surprise, he discovered all three were willing to work on his next album; Hiatt and his dream band went into an L.A. studio and knocked off Bring the Family in a mere four days, and the result was the best album of Hiatt's career.”
 
Here’s “Riding with the King” – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njdPbIZvONg
 
And from Bring the Family – love “Memphis in the Meantime” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwb1Y396cPk
 
… and the most excellent “Have a Little Faith in Me” … 



"The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us." ~ Bill Watterson




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Terje Rydal was born on this day in 1947, in Oslo Norway. He is something of a phenomenon – a longstanding member of the ECM stable and revered among guitarists who know what they’re on about. What I had not been aware of, until exploring his discography, is that he’s actually a multi-instrumentalist who can, and does, find his way (with consummate ease, might I just add) around the Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Piano, Electric Piano, Soprano Saxophone, Flute, Glockenspiel and Bells (all of the above on After the Rain); he is also not averse to slipping in the odd synth or two and he has produced works that don’t show off his much lauded guitar skills. The only instrument he doesn’t use (with the exception of on his first solo album), is his voice. He was classically trained on the piano and trumpet, and studied music at the University of Oslo and at the Oslo Music Conservatory.
 
He has performed and recorded as a sideman with Jan Garbarek and any number of his Viking brothers, as well as those unlikely to be sporting red beards, and has also released around 28 albums either solo, as leader, or with an ensemble.
 
One would most definitely acknowledge a lot of what he does as jazz or to put a finer point on it, contemporary jazz, but he merrily flattens the genre barriers between rock, fusion, classical and avant garde/experimental. I have made a tiny dent in his catalogue and developed a few favourites along the way ….
 
The one and only song from Bleak Househttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmPQOhjpgqc
 
From If Mountains Could Sing – “The Return of Per Ulv” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7UJriViMqM
 
 “Last Night” from his album with The Chasers – Blue … cover artwork reminds me of Vangelis’ China https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSBi92XsMTE
 
And from After The Rain – Autumn Breeze … 



"The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us." ~ Bill Watterson




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(19-08-2017, 17:14)Ruby Wrote: Gustavo Santaolalla was born on this day in 1951, in El Palomar, Argentina. He sings, and plays the charango, ronroco, guitar, bass and piano and aside from his three solo albums, is the composer of many film scores, including the Oscar winning soundtracks for Brokeback Mountain and Babel, the latter of which contains the stunning title track … the piece that made me notice him ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvdzavGmZww.
 
Another soundtrack I like is from the movie Nanga Parbat, about the Messner brother’s 1970 climb of that very tricky peak. Not a mountain to be messed with this one, the ninth highest in the world and the claimant of many lives. I read a book called “Tigers of the Snow” which covers the disastrous 1934 German expedition to Nanga Parbat about which it is said "for sheer protracted agony, has no parallel in climbing annals." Hectic stuff – the Sherpas were not mountaineers – rather revered the mountains, but in a nutshell, were incredibly poor and drawn by such simple payment as a pair of (used) boots, started working as porters for the ambitious Brits around the 1920’s. On this occasion, in order to save their own skins, two experienced German climbers unroped from their party of Sherpas and skied off down the mountain, leaving them adrift, to fend for themselves – it didn’t end well. Dastardly stuff. Anyway getting back to the movie which is about a different tragic incident, the music works perfectly … this is “The Rescue” … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpSoihfAHs8
 
"Iguazu" from Ronroco has been used in various soundtracks - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfusxHokCDg
 
… and there’s so much more -  difficult to choose! This piece of gorgeousness, also from Ronroco, is on the soundtrack of The Motorcycle Diaries … 




Coyita is another magnificent track of his. I see you have read 'Tigers in the Snow' as well. There are two books that stand out for me when it comes to mountaineering and all the insanity that goes with it. Joe Simpson's 'The Beckoning Silence' is magnificent - read it while listening to Brian Eno's 'Apollo' album. The two just seem to go together perfectly. The other one is 'The White Spider' considered by many in the know to be the ultimate book on mountaineering. The author (forget his name now) also wrote 'Seven Years in Tibet'. https://youtu.be/zX5fF_KaSIE
'The purpose of life is a life of purpose' - Athena Orchard.
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