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Albums Albums Albums!
#21
I am so confused right now.  I thought I knew Eric Clapton.  The guy that'll melt your face off with his incendiary solos?  That guy??  The Five Long Years guy??  Where is that guy??  I just finished listening to 461 Ocean Blvd - it's like he can't be bothered!  WTF?!  He didn't even bother dialing it in.  Heck the keyboard guy sees more soloing action than Clapton does!  Sounds like he's having fun alright, but he sounds like he's trying to be JJ Cale or something.  I want my money back!

Boo hiss.

(Nothing against you Ruby...  The other thing was great though - I thought.  Just my opinion, what do I know.)

Oooo - Rainbow! Now we're talking.
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#22
My favourite Clapton moment - https://youtu.be/A7yrxVJ_90k
Ninety nine percent of the world's lovers aren't with their first choice. That's what makes the jukebox play - Willie Nelson
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#23
(17-11-2021, 14:54)JeromeD Wrote: My favourite Clapton moment - https://youtu.be/A7yrxVJ_
Haven't gotten to the Clapton thing so far.  I'm listening (have been) listening to your music.  I'm on Esoteric Movements.  Pretty good!  I don't know whether that's the one you told me not to start with, doesn't matter.  I do the whole thing whenever possible.  It sounds like a cross between what I listen to when I meditate and a John Carpenter soundtrack, so I'm totally okay with it.  It doesn't sound "foreign" or weird.  It sounds like something I know, like something I do when I need to zone out, you know?  
I have exactly zero idea how you do that.  Get organized into doing something like that.  The first track was what - 23 minutes 10 seconds?  And it all melds one bit into the next - there's no cutoff.  How do you keep it organized in your brain?  When I write a song, it's stoopid verse / chorus / verse etc. whereas there are none of that here.  At best, certain themes, but I don't even hear them repeating outside their allotted slot of time along the track - so THAT blows my mind.  How do you roll out of bed and go "Oh yeah, the part where it goes Tuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-NUH, it needs a whooshy sound lol.  WTF??!  Plus I wouldn't know a midi sequencer if I choked on one.  I'm a troglodyte guitar drums amps guy, but I find this to be very well done.  I particularly like the third track (so far) on that first bit ("Esoteric").  
Well done, you!  Clapton's gonna have to wait.

"Into Imagined Lands" - those are real drums right? They sound way too dynamic to be canned. What about the guitar? Is that you? The violin??
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#24
Ok, limping home from a hard day's listening.  

Heavy Horses (Tull) turned out to be too much of a challenge for me.  It exhausted me.  In my opinion, it has no heads or tails, it does complete turnarounds the second you think you have a song figured out.  It'll go from lovely little ditty with flute, almost medieval, then boom! - an asymmetrical riff on guitar and bass, backed by the drums.  Certain stanzas or ideas are introduced with lightning quick interludes so that the main motif of the song is lost.  And that is probably why they call it "progressive rock".  And that is probably why I steer away from all things Marillion and Yes and King Crimson et al.  

On the other hand, Camel was a fun surprise.  I'd heard a few of their albums before but I didn't recognize their "sound" here.  Sure, there are blazing guitar solos (and just a wicked guitar SOUND, not too cranking on the distortion but just hitting the sweet spot for the feedback), abrupt tempo changes to give you whiplash but by the time the album got to a sweet little passage with oboe and bassoon, I'm thinking what the FUCK is this??!  I LIKED it, but this wasn't the Camel I thought I knew.  I looked into it and - ah!  "Music inspired by" the Snow Goose.  It's a friggin' MOVIE, after a novella.  Now that's damn well done if you ask me.  Parts of this sounded like a Disney cartoon soundtrack.  This was a very pleasant surprise.  

Vangelis I don't stand a chance.  Not going anywhere with this.

Avalon is a no-brainer, which is a relief to me that I'm perhaps not a complete moron.  Phew!  I grew up listening to that bad boy.  Floyd, d'uh.  Ok so all is not lost...  Still...  This is a workout.  Hey Music Head!  You "only" have three and a half thousand frickin' albums - suggest one!  (Though not quite done with Ruby's list...)  

Here I got one, in the Underappreciated Albums Du Jour category - Love & Rockets: Earth Sun Moon. 

Diggit.

Whoah!  I just graduated from "Roadie" to "Band Member!"  

I'm drunk with power.
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#25
lol

Ian Hunter - Ian Hunter
debut

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#26
(18-11-2021, 14:10)rockenheimer Wrote:
(17-11-2021, 14:54)JeromeD Wrote: My favourite Clapton moment - https://youtu.be/A7yrxVJ_
Haven't gotten to the Clapton thing so far.  I'm listening (have been) listening to your music.  I'm on Esoteric Movements.  Pretty good!  I don't know whether that's the one you told me not to start with, doesn't matter.  I do the whole thing whenever possible.  It sounds like a cross between what I listen to when I meditate and a John Carpenter soundtrack, so I'm totally okay with it.  It doesn't sound "foreign" or weird.  It sounds like something I know, like something I do when I need to zone out, you know?  
I have exactly zero idea how you do that.  Get organized into doing something like that.  The first track was what - 23 minutes 10 seconds?  And it all melds one bit into the next - there's no cutoff.  How do you keep it organized in your brain?  When I write a song, it's stoopid verse / chorus / verse etc. whereas there are none of that here.  At best, certain themes, but I don't even hear them repeating outside their allotted slot of time along the track - so THAT blows my mind.  How do you roll out of bed and go "Oh yeah, the part where it goes Tuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-NUH, it needs a whooshy sound lol.  WTF??!  Plus I wouldn't know a midi sequencer if I choked on one.  I'm a troglodyte guitar drums amps guy, but I find this to be very well done.  I particularly like the third track (so far) on that first bit ("Esoteric").  
Well done, you!  Clapton's gonna have to wait.

"Into Imagined Lands" - those are real drums right?  They sound way too dynamic to be canned.  What about the guitar?  Is that you?  The violin??

Real drums on IIL - a guy by the name of Marc Norgaard from Baltimore, Maryland. The violin is synthesised. Yours truly. The cello is by Evva Mizerska, a Polish girl living and working in London. There are some ethnic instruments here and there - some are me on synths and some are by a guy called John Zytaruk from your neck of the woods - Toronto.
Dave Sturt provided some bass parts - London. And the quiet piano section on the second last track is by Simon D'Aquino, a guy from OZ of Italian descent. All the guitar bits and everything else is by Yours Truly - a South African living in Ireland. BTW I have written many 'stoopid' verse/chorus things in the past but never recorded them. I could never find the right vocalists for the parts - middle of the road folk/rock stuff. 'Normal' music. It is just as challenging to write a good song as it is too write instrumental stuff. As for how I come up with the different ideas. Imagination. Once I have the start sorted out in my head I let it simmer - sometimes for months or years and I try to think of something that will blend well and 'lead' me into the next part. You used the word meditate when describing what you were listening to. I get that a lot and I don't know why. It's not intentional - it just happens. I was a drummer in my twenties, then a guitarist - first folk/acoustic stuff then electric later and now I dabble with synths /MIDI/sequencing and DAW's. I just like the creative process - you start with a blank canvas and after a year or two you have a picture to look at. I find the whole process similar to building a jigsaw puzzle. All these bits are floating around in your head and slowly but surely you find a place for each part to slot in and at the end of the day you have a picture. Like when you see a slo-mo movie of a lightbulb exploding - but played backwards!! My music is not designed to be consciously listened to. More as a companion to something else you are doing. As a kid I used to spend hours and hours doing pencil sketches of futuristic type landscapes and sometimes just standard portraits of people. I would always have an album playing in the background. Some of the best times of my life. Total escapism. Lost in a world of imagination. OK I am off to therapy classes now! - too de loo! BTW stick around  - you are injecting some life into the forum.   
Ninety nine percent of the world's lovers aren't with their first choice. That's what makes the jukebox play - Willie Nelson
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#27
(18-11-2021, 22:31)Music Head Wrote: lol

Ian Hunter - Ian Hunter
debut

Oo Music Head!  You're really going all out with this one eh?  You're really scraping the bottom of the barrel here!  Three and a half thousand albums and you're hitting me with Ian Hunter?  I was expecting something a little more obscure like Granicus.  

I'm busting your balls. 

I was more a Mott the Hoople guy but yeah, this is alright.  Even the flip side ain't too bad.  I really liked that guitar sound in Lounge Lizard, in the solo, then of course I looked into it, cuz I have no life.  Boom: co-produced with Mick Ronson.  Mick was no dunce on a guitar it turns out, as you know.  "Boy" was oddly touching I thought.  The closer, borderline anthemic.  

Lucifer's Friend?  Their 1st album?  I latched onto that mofo cuz Lawton sang in Uriah Heep so of course I had to stick my head in this over here - glad I did!

Insert secret devil sign / horned fist here!
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#28
You mentioned John Carpenter - someone I am not familiar with at all. Thx for the head's up. Something to explore this weekend!
Ninety nine percent of the world's lovers aren't with their first choice. That's what makes the jukebox play - Willie Nelson
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#29
Morning, dude!

Yeah, he's a horror movie director and writer - and he usually made the music to his own movies. You probably heard his work then. "The Thing", "Halloween", "The Fog", "Prince of Darkness", "Escape From NY", "Escape from LA", "Escape From McDonald's". (Ok I made that last one up...)

Rainy Day Album Du Jour: Sexual Roulette by Art Bergmann.
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#30
^^
ive seen all of those except "prince of darkness",
still have nightmares over "escape from McDonalds" though LOL
“Sgt Pepper did its thing it was the album of the decade, maybe the Century. 
It was innovative with great songs, I’m glad I was on it but the ‘White’ album ended up a better album for me.” Ringo Starr
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